FN0380-RECREATIONAL – Fin Fish (Other than Salmon) – Rockfish and Yelloweye Rockfish – Management Measures Currently in Effect Until Further Notice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fishery Notice – Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Subject: FN0380-RECREATIONAL – Fin Fish (Other than Salmon) – Rockfish and Yelloweye Rockfish – Management Measures Currently in Effect Until Further Notice

The following management measures are required to reduce fishing impacts on

Yelloweye rockfish.

Further measures are currently being considered and will be announced in-season.

North coast Waters (Areas 1 to 10 and 101 to 110, 130 and 142)

————————————————————–

Effective April 1, 2017 until further notice the daily limit for rockfish is

five (5) per day in the aggregate of which only two (2) may be Yelloweye

rockfish.

South Coast waters (Areas 11, 20-1 to 20-4, 21 to 27, 111, 121 and 123 to 127)

————————————————————–

Effective April 1, 2017 until further notice the daily limit for rockfish is

three (3) per day in the aggregate of which only one (1) may be Yelloweye

Rockfish.

Variation Order 2017-176

Note: Special limits apply for groundfish in Pacific Rim National Park.

The exceptions to these openings are:

 

Area 121:

No person shall fish for or retain halibut, rockfish and lingcod in Area 121

outside the 12 nautical mile limit seaward of a line that begins at 48 degrees

34.000 minutes and 125 degrees 17.386 minutes W and continues south easterly at

a bearing of 116 degrees True to a point at 48 degrees 28.327 minutes and 125

degrees 01.687 minutes W.

 

Area 121:

Closed to all finfish, year round in the waters of Swiftsure Bank, inside a

line from 48 degrees 34.00 minutes N and 125 degrees 06.00 minutes W, thence to

48 degrees 34.00 minutes N and 124 degrees 54.20 minutes W, thence to 48

degrees 29.62 minutes N and 124 degrees 43.40 minutes W, thence following the

International Boundary between Canada and the U.S. to 48 degrees 29.55 minutes

N and 124 degrees 56.20 minutes W, thence in a straight line to the point of commencement.

Note: Rockfish Conservations Areas (RCA’s) remain in effect – refer to the

following website for descriptions:

http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/restricted-restreint/rca-acs-eng.htm.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Contact: Brad Beaith 250-756-7190 or John Webb 250-627-3409

Fisheries and Oceans Canada Operations Center – FN0380

Sent April 19, 2017 at 14:03

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What makes it different? – Archery Report – Bob O’Brien

What makes it different?

The BC Indoors was in Armstrong on Easter weekend, 133 archers.  I
am always intrigued at how different I feel shooting an event compared to
the regular shooting we do at the range.  The distance is the same,
targets, scoring, timing, all the same, the lighting is much better (see
photo of target lights) and it was even warm, and same as at the range,once you let go there is no getting it back…good or bad.

If you are interested in trying out shooting at events please let me know and I will pass on the information I have on what is coming up this summer (BC Outdoors will be hosted in Duncan on the Labour Day weekend).

Miranda Mail also shot in Armstrong.  She did very well , winning, setting a BC Indoor record, and most impressively shooting well enough to qualify for a FITA Target Award (Federation of International Target Archers). – Congratulations to Miranda for a great shoot.

May is the last month of indoor shooting, we will open again in
September.  There is outdoor shooting available at both the Henry and
Dorman ranges.
I would like to hear from the members of what they thought went well and what we could improve for the next season.  Please send me your comments directly to bobob@telus.net and we will see what we can accomplish next.

Shoot Strong
Bob O’Brien

 

FN0443-RECREATIONAL – Rockfish and Lingcod – Coast-wide – Areas 1 to 29, 101 to 111, 121, 123 to 127, 130 and 142 – Daily Limits and Close Times

RECREATIONAL - Fin Fish (Other than Salmon)

    Fishery Notice - Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Subject: FN0443-RECREATIONAL - Rockfish and Lingcod - Coast-wide - Areas 1 to 29, 101 to 111, 121, 123 to 127, 130 and 142 - Daily Limits and Close Times 

Effective May 19, 2017 to March 31, 2018, the following recreational daily 
limits and close times apply to Rockfish and Lingcod in North and South Coast 
waters. 

North Coast – Areas 1 to 10, 101 to 110, 130, 142
Daily limits: Rockfish, all species combined - three (3); yelloweye rockfish - 
one (1); lingcod - two (2)
Close time: November 16 to March 31 (open April 1 to November 15)

South Coast (outside waters) – Areas 11, 21 to 27, 111, 123 to 127, Subareas 12-
14 and 20-1 to 20-4, and Area 121 except for that portion outside the 12 
nautical mile limit seaward of a line that begins at 48o34.00’ north latitude 
and 125o17.386’ west longitude and continues southeasterly at a bearing of 116o 
True to a point at 48o28.327’ north latitude and 125o01.687’ west longitude.
Daily limits: Rockfish, all species combined - two (2); yelloweye rockfish - 
one (1); lingcod - two (2)
Close time: November 16 to March 31 (open April 1 to November 15)

South Coast (inside waters) – Areas 13 to 19 and Subareas 12-1 to 12-13, 12-15 
to 12-48, 20-5 to 20-7 and 29-5
Daily limits: Rockfish, all species combined - one (1); yelloweye rockfish - 
one (1); lingcod - one (1)
Close time: October 1 to April 30 (open May 1 to September 30)

Area 28 and Subareas 29-1 to 29-4 and 29-6 to 29-17
Closed April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018

Variation Orders 2017-272 and 2017-275


Notes:

Please review the BC Sport Fishing Guide online at 
http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/index-eng.html, for any other 
restrictions that apply to the Area that you are fishing in, such as finfish 
closures, size limits, annual limits, and permitted gear.

Did you witness suspicious fishing activity or a violation?  If so, please call 
the Fisheries and Ocean Canada 24-hour toll free Observe, Record, Report line 
at 1-800-465-4336.

For the 24 hour recorded opening and closure line, call toll free at 
1-866-431-FISH (3474).


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

CONTACT INFO
Brad Beaith
South Coast Recreational Fisheries
250 756-7190
Brad.Beaith@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

John Webb
North Coast Recreational Fisheries
250 627-3409
John.Webb@dfo-mpo.gc.ca


Fisheries and Oceans Canada Operations Center - FN0443
Sent May 18, 2017 at 10:52
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Dorman Range – April/May 2017

Welcome to Spring.  We are still waiting for some extended periods of sunshine.  I guess the flowers and trees appreciate the frequent rainfalls but at least we haven’t had any snow for a while now, and the temperature has warmed up.

This report is a little lengthy as it goes back to the March 25 Sporting Clays.  That event was dedicated to the Oceanside Stroke Recovery Society.  We had a record (or near record) turnout for the shoot, with 102 shooters.  The lunch for this event was prepared by the ladies of the Oceanside Stroke Recovery Society.  They had also prepared the lunch for the February Sporting Clays.  Thanks very much, ladies; the lunches were delicious.

We were able to donate $2,865 to their program.

As in all our Sporting Clays shoots, the shooters are placed in various classes; Class A for the good shooters, right through to Class E for the novice shooters.  For the March 25 Sporting Clays, the high Class A shooters were Brian Royan with an 89, James Wicks with an 87, Jared Earthy with an 86, Ron Stubbings with an 81 and Tom Dawes with an 80.  For Class B, the high shooters were Bill McNeilly with an 84, Dane Hryhoryshen and Jack Morgan with 81’s, and Darren Perrens (our caretaker) with an 80.  All together there were 11 people in the 80’s and 12 people in the 70’s.  The average score was 59.

Read More Dorman_Newsletter_AprilMay2017

Fishing Forever – May 26th Coombs Campground

                                      Fishing Forever

Fishing Forever began in 1989 after a broadcast journalist, Walt Liimatainnen was diagnosed with a debilitating disease.  He wanted to continue enjoying the great outdoors as he had for many years and wanted others to have the same opportunity.

Other clubs had preceded Fishing Forever by having events for the blind.

Over 20 years ago Pete Roberts, a long time member and possibly our elder statesman of the club, was the coordinator and the event took place at the French Creek Marina.  The club enlisted sports fishers who donated their craft and time to take the handicapped, (including the blind) for a day’s fishing in the waters off French Creek.  At the time there were many large salmon caught.  One resident of Trillium Lodge, Winni LaMarsh who was 93 years old at the time, hauled in two large salmon.

As time went on it became increasingly expensive for the boat owners and it was becoming difficult to load some wheelchair bound participants and it was decided to change the venue to a local lake.  This is where our former coordinator, Brian Borrett, came into the picture and held the first event at Spider Lake.  The lake wasn’t very friendly to those lining the shore and casting for either trout or bass.  Dan Siminiuk was able to land a few small bass but others were unsuccessful.  Brian then moved the event to the Coombs Campground which had a large fishing pond for camping guests.  He was able to arrange the event at the campground by having the pond stocked with trout raised at the Vancouver Island University facilities.

The event continued to be a great success and the club received accolades from the care givers and their charges every year.  In fact we were told that it is one of the high lights of the year for the residents.

After the 2015 Fishing Forever took place Brian suffered a stroke and subsequently became a resident of a Care Home in Victoria.  Unfortunately, he passed away last year.

Not wanting to see this important event end, Len Fong approached a number of members who were willing to take on the derby.

You may wonder why it took three coordinators to replace Brian but Brian told us he began preparations for the event in January!  We soon found out why he began so early because it entails quite a bit of arranging and the logistics to make the event a success takes time.

We hope to see our perennial volunteers attend the Care Home Fishing Derby on Friday, May 26th and we are praying for a nice, sunny day.

Len Fong

Gord Gebhardt

John Domovich

 

 

Summer Picnic – July 8th 2017

CLUB PICNIC

Parksville Qualicum Fish & Game

Dorman Range, July 8th/ 2017

We are getting ready to arrange our annual club picnic that will be help on Saturday, July 8th at the Dorman range.

This is a great event with attendance from all sections of the club.  We have great sponsors and volunteers.  All members need is to bring a “pot luck” item.  We supply the meat and beverages.

For this to work, we require a coordinator.  This is someone who can pull the pieces together and make sure we have everything done before hand.  We can supply the expertise, you the leadership.

Without someone to take this on, we may need to look at whether we can run such an event and produce something members will be proud off.

If you are willing to take this on or just want more information on what you would need to do, give me a call at 604 880 3393 or email at rt50@shaw.ca  We would need someone to step forward by the end of May/beginning of June or we will be forced to cancel it.

 

Richard Thompson

PQFG President

Kids Camp – Update

Kid’s Camp

It’s time for the annual Kid’s Camp registration in preparation for the camp.

This year the camp is again being held at the Courtenay Fish and Game site on Comox Lake.

The dates are July  17th to 20. Ages are 10 – 14.

This is a free event.  You supply the sleeping bag and personal items, we supply everything else.

What happens at camp?  Under the supervision of experienced club members, youth will do hiking, fly tying and fishing in the lake, archery, hand gun, shot gun and long gun under one on one supervision and an old fashion swim in the lake.  We even throw in a DVD movie night and story telling.

For more information contact Larry Blair at wlblair@bcsupernet.com.  Larry can pass on any further information and will be receiving all applications.  Cutoff date is May 31, 2017.

I can also be contacted at rt50@shaw.ca and 604 880 3393.

Enjoy the outdoors..

Richard Thompson

President, PQFG

BCWF Report – April 2017

BCWF Report

April 25, 2017

With the Provincial election coming soon the BCWF has been hosting a series of “Town Hall Meetings” all over BC.  The purpose of these meetings is to bring some facts about the status of our fish and wildlife resources to the attention of our members and to offer questions to ask candidates for election.  Over the past fifteen years the funding for fish and wildlife resource management has remained flat while the overall Provincial budget has increased dramatically overall.  “We need more funding, more science and more social support” was the main message.

In the Times Colonist, on April 26, columnist Jack Knox wrote his insights from the BCWF Town Hall Meeting in Victoria. “Wildlife ‘train wreck’ goes largely unnoticed” was his heading.  The reason for this, Knox believes, is that with 48 of BC’s 87 electoral districts in the lower mainland and Fraser Valley the public will not hear about conservation issues.  The election will be won on issues like housing prices, bridge tolls, the homeless and not on action around vanishing woodland caribou.

Several of us PQ club members attended the Town Hall meeting hosted at the Nanaimo club facility.  It was well attended and the NDP and Green party candidates did a brief presentation.  But the meeting was all about the abysmal state of fish and wildlife populations throughout the province.  Staple game species like moose are down 50 – 70% in BC’s interior.  The world famous Thompson River steelhead are down to 430 fish.  Mule deer and elk in the interior are also in trouble.  So far this year two or three steelhead have been found in the Gold River.  All of this is because fish and wildlife resources are not a priority of our Provincial Government.  Managing bag limits and allowable catches amount to “management to zero.” Reprinted here are the five questions the BCWF suggests we might want to ask our future MLAs.

PARTY AND CANDIDATE QUESTIONS FOR 2017 PROVINCIAL ELECTION

  1. In terms of fish, wildlife and habitat, British Columbia is one of the most diverse jurisdictions in North America. At the same time, B.C. is one of the most under-funded jurisdictions in North America and has no dedicated funding model.  Would you support increased funding for fish, wildlife and habitat (i.e. watershed, landscape) management?  Yes/No/How?
  2. Fish, wildlife and habitat management in B.C. are currently objectiveless. Many fish and wildlife populations are in decline, and some are at record lows.  Cumulative effects in parts of British Columbia from unsustainable resource extraction, invasive species, over-allocation of water resources, and road densities have left our landscape “in the red”.  Do you support legislated objectives for habitat, fish and wildlife populations? Yes/No/Why? How would you achieve them?
  3. Many mountain caribou populations are at a record low and moose populations are in significant decline in parts of B.C. Science has shown anthropogenic change as the leading cause, as wolf predation has become a major source of mortality.  Do you support predator management as a part of sustainable science-based wildlife management?
  4. First Nations negotiations in B.C. are ongoing. These negotiations are Government to Government with no public transparency or consultation.  This approach is divisive and is creating significant uncertainty and externalities due to a lack of public involvement.  Do you believe the public should be involved or consulted, related to negotiations? Yes/No/Why/How?
  5. Public access to public resources such as fish, wildlife, public roads, and campsites is a growing issue in British Columbia. Is public access to public resources, such as fishing, hunting, camping and hiking important to you? How will you deal with these issues?

Respectfully submitted

Rod Wiebe, Past President PQF&G 1992 – 1998

Proposed Change to Firearms Marking Regulations Bill C-10A

Proposed Change to Firearms Marking Regulations Bill C-10A

If this is something you are concerned about, here is a printable letter to send to the Minister of Public Safety.

RSSCLetter to Minister March 2017

Link here to Victoria Fish and Game’s Call to Action /

http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/c10a-eng.htm

http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=2336764&Language=E&Mode=1&File=24